International Eel Smuggling Scheme Centers On Maine

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John Goodenough's work led to the lithium-ion battery, now found in everything from phones to electric cars. He and fellow researchers at the University of Texas, Austin say they've come up with a faster-charging alternative. Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

At 94, Lithium-Ion Pioneer Eyes A New Longer-Lasting Battery

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For children over 1 year old, pediatricians strongly recommend whole fruit instead of juice, because it contains fiber, which slows the absorption of sugar and fills you up the way juice doesn't. KathyDewar/Getty Images hide caption

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KathyDewar/Getty Images

Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

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Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

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Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron that injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

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A ladybug unfolds its wings. Scientists have had trouble figuring out how ladybugs fold their wings back up — but a team in Japan found a way to see the process. University of Tokyo/PNAS hide caption

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University of Tokyo/PNAS

A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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A flag bearing the company logo of Royal Dutch Shell flies outside the energy giant's head office in The Hague, Netherlands, in 2014. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Energy Companies Urge Trump To Remain In Paris Climate Agreement

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A plasticine caterpillar glistens with moisture while awaiting potential predator attacks in the forest of Tai Po Kau, Hong Kong. Chung Yun Tak/Science hide caption

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Chung Yun Tak/Science

Scientists Glued Fake Caterpillars On Plants Worldwide. Here's What Happened

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The Agriculture Department established research centers in 2014 to translate climate science into real-world ideas to help farmers and ranchers adapt to a hotter climate. But a tone of skepticism about climate change from the Trump administration has some farmers worried that this research they rely on may now be in jeopardy. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Workers prepare to release thousands of fingerling Chinook salmon into the Mare Island Strait in Vallejo, Calif., in 2014. A new report names climate change, dams and agriculture as the major threats to the prized and iconic fish, which is still the core of the state's robust fishing industry. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

An orangutan mother and her 11-month old infant in Borneo. Orangutans breast-feed offspring off and on for up to eight years. Tim Laman/Science Advances hide caption

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Tim Laman/Science Advances

Orangutan Moms Are The Primate Champs Of Breast-Feeding

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

Total Failure: When The Space Shuttle Didn't Come Home

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Tyrannosaurus rex jaws generated 8,000-pound bite forces and let the creature eat everything from duck-billed dinosaurs to triceratops. Scientific Reports hide caption

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Scientific Reports

Tyrannosaurus Rex's Bite Force Measured 8,000 Pounds, Scientists Say

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Advice For Your Dinner Party Stories: Keep It Familiar

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